How unconsciousness differs from consciousness

Etymology[ edit ] John LockeBritish philosopher active in the 17th century The origin of the modern concept of consciousness is often attributed to John Locke 's Essay Concerning Human Understandingpublished in The English word "conscious" originally derived from the Latin conscius con- "together" and scio "to know"but the Latin word did not have the same meaning as our word—it meant "knowing with", in other words "having joint or common knowledge with another".

How unconsciousness differs from consciousness

How unconsciousness differs from consciousness

One daylight, and the one we keep in shadow. Carl Jung is a great bridge for we Westerners to a way of life which can, after all, help us access those truths.

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A necessary step in this direction, however, is a confrontation with our self. Portrayals of the shadow in art: Darth Vadar in Star Wars. The Joker, in The Dark Knight. Hyde, in Jekyll and Hyde. Their relation to the instincts has been discussed elsewhere.

The archetypes most clearly characterized from the empirical point of view are those which have the most frequent and the most disturbing influence on the ego. These are the shadowthe anima and the animus. The most accessible of these, and the easiest to experience, is the shadow, for its nature can in large measure be inferred from the contents of the personal unconscious.

The only exceptions to this rule are those rather rare cases where the positive qualities of the personality are repressed, and the ego in consequence plays an essentially negative or unfavorable role. The shadow is a moral problem that challenges the whole ego-personality, for no one can become conscious of the shadow without considerable moral effort.

To become conscious of it involves recognizing the dark aspects of the personality as present and real. This act is the essential condition for any kind of self-knowledge, and it therefore, as a rule, meets with considerable resistance. Indeed, self-knowledge as a psychotherapeutic measure frequently requires much painstaking work extending over a long period.

Closer examination of the dark characteristics — that is, the inferiorities constituting the shadow — reveals that they have an emotional nature, a kind of autonomy, and accordingly an obsessive, or, better, possessive quality.

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Emotion, incidentally, is not an activity of the individual but something that happens to him. Affects occur usually where adaptation is weakest, and at the same time they reveal the reason for its weakness, namely a certain degree of inferiority and the existence of a lower level of personality.

On this lower level with its uncontrolled or scarcely controlled emotions one behaves more or less like a primitive, who is not only the passive victim of his affects, but also singularly incapable of moral judgment.

Although, with insight and good will, the shadow can to some extent be assimilated into the conscious personality, experience shows that there are certain features which offer the most obstinate resistance to oral control and prove almost impossible to influence.

These resistances are usually bound up with projections, which are not recognized as such, and their recognition if a moral achievement beyond the ordinary.

No matter how obvious it may be to the neutral observer that it is a matter of projection, there is little hope that the subject will perceive this himself. He must be convinced that he throws a very long shadow before he is willing to withdraw his emotionally-toned projections from their object.

Let us suppose that a certain individual shows no inclination whatever to recognize his projections. The projection-making factor then has a free hand and can realize its object — if it has one — or bring about some other situation characteristic of its power.

As we know, it is not the conscious subject but the unconscious which does the projecting. Hence one meets with projections, one does not make them.Consciousness is not the product of brain activity: It is the fundamental reality without which thinking as a conscious activity could never take place.

The totality of our consciousness is comprised of three levels: the subconscious, the conscious, and the superconscious. Introduction to Consciousness Describing Consciousness Consciousness is an individual’s state of awareness of their environment, thoughts, feelings, or sensations; in order to experience consciousness, one must be both awake and aware.

Reality. Reality is a consciousness. program (hologram, simulation, illusion, dream) created by digital codes.. Numbers, numeric codes, define our existence and experiences.

Human DNA, our genetic memory, triggers (remembers) by digital codes at specific times and frequencies as we experience. Philosophy of Dreaming. According to Owen Flanagan (), there are four major philosophical questions about dreaming: 1.

How can I be sure I am not always dreaming? Consciousness may have a determinative role in quantum mechanics. Since consciousness is the primary aspect of an observer, and observation is sometimes viewed as a primary reason for apparent wave function collapse, consciousness may account for aspects of the measurement problem exemplified by the Schrödinger's cat paradox.

The Rosicrucian Cosmo-Conception Chapter II The Four Kingdoms. The three Worlds of our planet are at present the field of evolution for a number of different kingdoms of life, at various stages of development.

How unconsciousness differs from consciousness

Only four of these need concern us at present, viz.: the mineral, plant, animal, and human kingdoms.

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